Rethinking one’s Digital Identity

Due to someone in my family being sick, I haven’t been to re-publica 09 today, and therefore missed some high-profile speakers. But real family life is more important than virtual digital life, even in 2009, and even with Cory Doctorow on the podium.
 
Will be on the web later today, anyway.
 
Still, I have been thinking lately, and that is not a good sign, as those who know me can confirm.
 
The thing is, I’m not so sure about how I run my weblog, anymore. I have been blogging since Oct. 30, 2000, mostly in German, under various domain names. I’m writing bluelectric.org for three and a half year now, and even with all the recent additions, such as a lifestream on the front page and links to other locations where I’m present on the Net, I feel some stagnation. Not in circulation – actually, this has improved recently, giving me some hope that all this is not for the digital trash can.
 
But life seems to be elsewhere on the Net – I mean: lively life. Beginning in February, I started what one might call „speed blogging“, using posterous.com, email and a nifty bookmarklet to feed a posterous blog, and it is so much fun that, by now, it is almost my sole meaning of blogging.
 
Then, Twitter has become an integral part of my digital life, lively and fast-paced as hell. What’s more, even my Facebook account seems to gain speed, right after I was about to cancel it altogether due to the company’s copyright shenanigans…
 
So what I’m looking at is a distributed but very alive digital presence of mine, going on on somebody else’s servers, sometimes paid for, sometimes for free. And poor old bluelectric.org is just collecting all those goings-on and displaying it in a (hopefully) neat way – basically just another lifestream application (with a lifestream app of itself inside).
 
Hm. So I’m actually considering abandoning (or rather, redirecting) bluelectric.org in favor of epost.bluelectric.org which is simpler, faster, cleaner, newer, etc.
 
And now: English? Yes, maybe English. After all, I have spent almost eight years of my life in the U.S., and there used to be a time when even my dreams were in English. SO why shouldn’t I switch to my second language which happens to be one of the most-used languages on this planet – at the risk of losing parts of my audience here and on Twitter and on Facebook, but with the chance to reach a wider audience overall.
 
So. There you have it. This is what’s going on in my mind these days. Discuss.

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